Thinking Outside of the Box

A robotic approach will never allow you to stretch your innate, creative muscle.

We’re not talking abut the brushstrokes on a canvas or writing a symphony, but rather creative thinking, problem solving, and searching for a proper outcome that wasn’t prescribed.

There are moments throughout your professional career where you are met with challenges that will require a different side of yourself. Is it better to play it safe? Go by the book? Are you worried about ruffling feathers?

Complex problems require creative solutions.

If you’re stuck or finding the same results keep coming back to you, the way forward may be something slightly less familiar — albeit slightly uncomfortable. Do you need to change your approach? Do something daring? Go against the grain of your own mind? Something outside of your job description, responsibilities, or office hours?

Recruiting is oftentimes an industry where many take the following approach in their day-to-day:

  • “Bill & Fill”

  • Meet a quota

  • Find a candidate based on blanket search instead of “true fit”

  • Casting a wide net without attention to detail of the individual

  • Robotic approach devoid of personable approach

This is something we’ve consciously worked to break as a norm for our industry. Placing a premium on the connection with people isn’t something that is given to you when you sign up to be a recruiter.

“Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn't really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That's because they were able to connect experiences they've had and synthesize new things.”

- Steve Jobs

If you’re looking for an inspirational story to start your day, week, month, check out this short podcast with one of our favorite recruiting stories.

5 Things You Should NEVER Say In An Interview

Interviewing for a position you really want can be nerve-racking and cause you to act in abnormal ways. Being on the spot, constantly having to keep composure, answer questions on the fly… all of this is hard and believe us — we know it well. 

So, in preparation for a conversation with your hiring manager or recruiter, your best bet is to not only prepare your professional acumen, but to also prepare your best self. When it comes to promoting the best parts of your personality, work history, awards, and so on, you’re more than likely coming out of the gate swinging. However, in our years of recruiting, we’ve seen some things we want to make sure you can avoid saying/doing. 

The 5 Things

1. “What’s the PTO Policy here?" Maybe save this question for the end of the interview and make sure you position this one with a bit more diplomacy. 

  • The better way to ask: “I’m curious about how the team handles time off with the flow of business at the company. Do most people find time to use their vacation?" This way you’re asking more generally and trying to find the answer by teeing up the hiring manager. 

2. “Is there good work/life balance at the company?” Ugh. This is a tough one. It’s something we all strive for and it’s achieved in fewer instances these days. However, coming across as “I don’t want to work TOO hard” is a bad foot to start on.

  • The better way to ask: “Is this a results-oriented company?" This question will position you as an expert. You’re a goal-oriented person and you’re thinking in that vein. Make sure you’re projecting your own performance is what will be of value to the company/position.

3. “Man… my current employer is terrible.” This is just a non-starter. If you’re in a place where you want to speak negatively about your current employer or previous, just don’t. Find someone who isn’t trying to hire you — like someone at the grocery store…. or your dog. 

  • The better way to say this: Don’t complain. Complaining is a surefire way of getting the call/interview to end quickly. Make sure you pair any shortcomings with potential solutions or opportunities in how YOU would handle things better next time around. 

4. Recruiter: “Do you have any questions for me?” You: "No.” Oh, boy. This is a frustrating one — and one we’ve encountered more than we’d like to say. 

  • The better approach this question: Don’t just flat out say “no.” Instead, go with something to the tune of “You know, I have a list of questions here and you’ve answered all of them throughout our conversation today. If I think of any follow-up questions, I’d love to email them to you, if that’s ok?"

5. Using Profanity. No. Just no. This is a definite non-starter for all of us — and probably every recruiter/hiring manager the world over.

  • The better approach: Just don’t use profanity. Period. Here’s the thing, sometimes hiring managers want to lure you into a false sense of security with them. Don’t fall for it and definitely don’t let your guard down. Also, if you have the mouth of a sailor, maybe try to bring it down a notch before your interview.

For a quick recap of these things, check out our accompanying podcast on these 5 things.